Benevolence

Hello, dear reader, this is a continuation of my discussion of the Seven Principles of Bioethics. The first was Autonomy and I’ll be writing more each day of the first week of 2017. So please take the time to read through the first one, to subscribe for future content, and to comment on your NYR in any one of the Seven Principles of Bioethics posts. This is #2 of seven, clearly.

Dia Kurosawa (left) and Mari Ohara (right) cards from the Love Live! School Idol Festival mobile game (available on iOS and Android, for JP server only)

Note that Dia’s birthday is actually New Year’s Day, so I guess it’s accurate to unofficially call this card set (total of nine)  the ‘New Year’s 2017″ set.

Benevolence

With benevolence, it takes the meaning of doing things in benefit of other people, to never be solely self-interested.  (Easier said than done, hahaha!)

For me, this means that I must try my best to assist with a patient’s preferences, capabilities, and ease. In general life, this means trying your best to do favours for others. That goes without needing to say “within reason”. If people ask for your life savings, or anything that is considered valuable and necessary for you to live with, then I wouldn’t consider it. The onus is on you to figure out what you can and can’t sacrifice to protect yourself and those around you.

While it may seem quite noble and expected to be abundant in society, in practice, it’s awfully difficult to perform properly. In many cases, what may be more beneficial for a patient may put at risk many other lives in the process (e.g.: manufacturing and handling radioactive isotopes for radiographic examinations). I’m reminded of this only recently, where my mother was required to fill out an MRI information form, which (in part) underlined the minor and severe health risks related to the MRI contrast material (requested by the doctor) to be injected.

Moreover, I also realise that it’s easy to misinterperet people’s devotion to helping other with being a jerk. People sometimes get so caught up on looking after one person that they forget to widen their vision and analytics to encompass the effect on others. We all fall victim to that, and while I personally am tolerant of it to some degree, I am not all-loving, despite my desire to be so.

I do believe that I accept things in a completely opposing way to what others believe in, and some days I just wish that people could just accept me, instead of trying to change me. Some days, people tell me off because they think I have no heart or vigour to go about doing things which are necessary to help others around us (i.e.: learning to drive, working part-time, completely abandoning gaming, and committing all friendships as superficial – to trust no one but your parents, who are as fallible as you are…but I digress).

In the end, that’s how I see it. What are your thoughts? Let me know either in the comments, or through the Contact Me page. Share it on social media to spread the discussion further, and subscribe to the blog to keep upt to date.

Thank you, my dear reader. Hope you have a Happy New Year, and as always, DFTBA!

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4 thoughts on “Benevolence

  1. “Some days, people tell me off because they think I have no heart or vigour to go about doing things which are necessary to help others around us (i.e.: learning to drive, working part-time, completely abandoning gaming, and committing all friendships as superficial – to trust no one but your parents, who are as fallible as you are…but I digress).”

    I agree bro, but it also means I can not tell them my thoughts anymore, they feel like it is burden on them so nowadays I just shut up about telling them about my life.
    I feel like either change or allowing them to listen to my depressive thoughts is a burden and before long they hate me for it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Totally agree and empathise with that sentiment. I get that a lot too…and it’s not helpful at all. In those cases, I try to just find my mind’s reset button and then tackle the problem later…when I’m not tied, grouchy or whatever.

      It takes time to get the rhythm going, and people may not understand it, and they may try to stop you from getting the flow. Those times when you do, if you can’t talk reason to them, I would ignore them. You do you, and they will tell you off all they want. But you’re the boss of yourself with personal health and safety.

      Like

  2. Definitely agree with the contents of this article. I have to keep myself in check and think over my actions in order to not blunder in and make things worse. That being said, it does make me a bit too cautious when helping others, and that makes things a bit hard…
    And the problem about acceptance…my mum seems to have a hard time accepting the fact that I like helping others (within reasonable limits, of course), and she would often tell me to not become involved in so much stuff. I always tell her that I help other within reasonable limits and that I make sure I don’t lose track of important things. But she wouldn’t accept my reasoning and sooner or later the argument would become huge…

    Liked by 1 person

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